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Archive for September, 2013

Greetings Everyone,

We almost missed a perfect day! We sailed to a little village called Kalkan but there was no where to anchor and the marina was full. We finally anchored Mediterranean style — we are becoming experts — in a beautiful bay about five miles away surrounded by sheer hillsides with no apparent access to the town.. So we swam around in the clear water and then Phil decided, late in the afternoon, we needed to go for a walk. So we climbed the mountain via a goat track and found at the to a huge Roman aquaduct built around 400 AD and down the other side a dirt road to a village and then a main road to Kalkan.

So the next day we climbed the mountain again, hitch-hiked into town and booked a tour for the following day to Xanthos with the driver agreeing to pick us up at the bottom of the mountain on the main road. We left in plenty of time and were patiently waiting. The bus came early and tooted for us so we crossed the road and got on. “Is this the tour bus to Xanthos”? “Yes — Xanthos.” But we soon realised it was the wrong bus — a market bus for the locals. The driver spoke no English and I had a lot of trouble getting him to stop and let us off. We practically ran back about two miles and just got there in time for our real tour bus — a VW minibus with just the driver, tour guide and one other couple. We had a fabulous time exploring the ruins at Xanthos, fording a tumultous stream through a steep canyon at Saklikent, visiting a carpet factory in another village and watching the whole process of hand-made carpets (some had over a million stitches and took over a year to make). Then we had a smorgasbord lunch with trout and a swim at the beach at Patara (another ancient ruins place) and then returned to the top of the mountain by the friendly tour guide — all for $A35 each. We were certainly blessed.

Yesterday we sailed (well motored, no wind) to Kas where we will spend a couple of days before heading further east.

God bless,

Pam and Phil

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Greetings Everyone,

Mediterranean mooring is definitely for the amusement of the locals at the expense of the uninitiated. It sounds easy — you drop anchor in quite deep water then back into the shore and take a line ashore and tie it to a tree. You don’t want to know the sorry saga of me trying not to collect the boat next to us, Phil sliding backwards down the vertical cliff and the rope wrapping around everything but the tree.

Anyway we are enjoying SAILING even if it’s more motor-sailing. They tell us this is the Motorterranean Sea. The boat handles well under both sail and motor and is probably a 1/2 knot faster than our old one.

We had a good shake-down cruise to a pretty little place called Ekincik and took a tourist trip up a river to some spectacular cave tombs and yesterday we arrived at Fethiye, a pretty and quite large town. We made contact with an English pastor and plan to go to church here on Sunday — a rarity in this Muslin country.

Phil has continued the fix-it jobs — the autopilot (which goes but wouldn’t dis-engage), the gas stove — blocked jets, the wind masthead unit (works now but reads back the front as he put the magnets in upside down and he says he’s not going back up the mast to fix it) and his favourite job — the head (when you pumped it out it returned half the doings back into the bowl). I don’t know what we would do if he wasn’t such a good fix-it man as all boats seem to be high maintenance.

The sea is gorgeous — turquoise blue and crystal clear. Phil is clocking up laps and I am enjoying lazing around in it. He plans to come home fit, especially as he has almost finished the supply of chocolate Michelle gave him for Father’s Day. Life is good.

God bless you all,

Pam and Phil.

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Greetings Everyone,

I’ve been waiting to report some progress. Today we finally went in the water. We were booked to go in yesterday but it just didn’t happen. Time here is a bit like PNG time.

It was our first attempt at tying up Mediterranean fashion today. You have to drop anchor or pick up a mooring line and back into the wharf between two other boats with virtually no spaces left. Very tricky. Then you put a boarding ladder from the boat to the wharf and ours managed to untie itself and slide headlong into twenty metres of water. Phil is still debating whether to try to retrieve it with the scuba gear or not.

Now we are waiting for some very still weather (it’s blowing up to 34 knots) to get the sails back on their tracks — the main and two roller furling headsails and trying to work out how the you-beaut sail cover bags work and where the other half of the lazy jacks are. Phil went up the mast to retrieve the wind instruments that were not functioning and spent all day putting them back together. (Any excuse not go go back up again). We went to put the dinghy in the water and found it had no painter so have to look for it.

We are still swimming in the marina pool each day and hob-nobbing with the “idle rich” but I want to go SAILING and wonder if the day will finally come.
God bless,

Pam and Phil

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