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Archive for the ‘Kimuta’ Category

Greetings Everyone,

Just an update on the situation in the Louisiades following cyclone Ita’s damage. The placed marked ** are where we have been working and have friends.

The following is the official government report as of two days ago:-

“The preliminary assessment report from the outstation confirms massive destruction to food gardens as well as dwelling units and local water supplies. No loss of lives was reported from the cyclone. However communication through Digicel mobile had been a problem with HF radio forming the bulk of communication throughout some parts. A report from Bwanabwana LLG also noted a missing boat MV Saga carrying 23 people on board still at large.

Table 1: showing number of homes destroyed by TC Ita. These figures are preliminary and the estimated number of houses destroyed is about 1160 and destroyed gardens about 5390.

  • ** Panaumala – Population affected 501, 18 houses destroyed,all food gardens destroyed
  • Bagaman – Population affected 335, 12 houses destroyed, all food gardens destroyed, VSAT communication affected
  • Motorina south – Population affected 295, 28 houses destroyed, all food gardens destroyed
  • Motorina North – Population affected 416, 7 houses destroyed, all food gardens destroyed
  • ** Brooker Island – Population affected 556, 25 houses destroyed, all food gardens destroyed
  • Panapompom – Population affected 675, 11 houses destroyed, all food gardens destroyed
  • ** East Panarati – Population affected 1024, 9 houses destroyed, all food gardens destroyed
  • ** West Panaeati – Population affected 843, 10 houses destroyed, all food gardens destroyed
  • ** Kimuta – Population affected 695, 15 houses destroyed, all food gardens destroyed, aid post building destroyed
  • Sabra – Population affected 1183, 39 houses destroyed, all food gardens destroyed
  • Grass Island – Population affected 970, 5 houses destroyed, all food garden destroyed
  • ** Western Point – Population affected 548, 23 houses destroyed, all food garden destroyed
  • Tagula station – Population affected 69, 4 houses destroyed
  • Nimoa – Population affected 789, 15 houses destroyed, all food gardens destroyed
  • ** Rambuso – Population affected 783, 2 houses destroyed, food garden destroyed
  • ** Rehuwo – Population affected 721, 23 houses destroyed, food gardens destroyed
  • Jinjo – Population affected 1084, 1 house destroyed, food garden destroyed
  • Njaru – Population affected 645, 2 houses destroyed, food garden destroyed
  • Pwambwa/** Saman – Population affected 744, 4 houses destroyed, 10 gardens destroyed
  • Ware – Population affected 955, 57 homes destroyed, all food gardens and classrooms partly destroyed
  • Kwaraiwa – Population affected 575, 7 homes destroyed,  all food gardens destroyed

There was no report from the south side of Sudest Island at that time but the latest information is that Jelewaga has been totally flattened. Nor has there been a report from Damunu on Rossel Island

The most critical problem is the fact that all the food gardens have been destroyed. These people are subsistence farmer and have virtually no access to alternative food supplies if their gardens fail or are destroyed. The pastor at Kimuta Island reported that the people were eating the coconuts that had fallen from the trees during the cyclone and when they are gone there is nothing else.

God bless,

Phil and Pam

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Greetings Everyone,

The music seminar was all that we hoped for and more.  We counted 157 attendees on the first day and more came over the next days.  I had 65 in my beginners group all of whom had never held a guitar.  We had 29 guitars, quite a few with strings missing and one without anything to attach them to.  The four guitar groups were divided again into two, working concurrently with the tambourine group to give everyone access to an instument.  The time-tabling for the various groups was quite complex and every day they got me to read over the timetable as I’m sure I had them quite baffled.

However, everything ran smoothly.  We used an old bugle we had on board as a change-over bell and people moved quickly between groups and obviously enjoyed each one.  On the final night we had a concert which was very unpolished because of the large numbers and short time but great fun and a breakthrough for many who had never “performed” before.  Every person had to do at least one item at the concert.

Three things in particular gave me great pleasure from this conference.  One was to see my 65 beginners all able to play D, G and A7, writing down five or six songs they could now go on with and keen to continue.  Another was to see the leadership team working incredibly hard and effectively.  I was especially proud of Ben, a young man showing great leadership potential, who took the top guitar group plus one of the 1 1/2 hour teaching sessions each day, and in between times played the guitar for the singing group.

The third thing was the overall results.  When we first came to Rossel Island eight years ago there were no guitars and virtually no one able to play.  Over the years we have supplied each of the eight main church fellowships with guitars.  The music seminar topped up the training for budding guitarists from all over the island so that many centres where they had no music now have a “band”, guitarist, singers and tambourine players.  It’s a big breakthrough and left the people grateful and excited.

We would love to get an experienced Guitarist/ worship leader/ worship song writer to come over for a few weeks and take them to a higher level then I can in these areas.  (Any volunteers for next year?).

We left Rossel after the conference with 33 on board, picked up another nine from Sudest Island and proceeded to Kimuta Island for a week long leaders conference.  After dropping them off we went to Misima and picked up another 45 and brought them to Kimuta for the conference.  This conference is going well with a lot of practical workshops on how to run funeral services, child dedications, baptisms, etc.  We haven’t had a big part to play in it, only a session on how to write letter for various situations, and are enjoying a more relaxed time and opportunities to sit and talk.

God bless you for yours prayers and continued interest in our happenings.

Pam and Phil

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They are keeping us busy — since we left Misima, apart from putting in a radio and solar panels and repairing six Coleman pressure lamps we have had the following:-

5/8 I preached at a church service at Jelewanga and Pam did a day teaching Sunday School teachers
12/8 Pam did a day teaching of Sunday School teachers at Damunu
16/8 We did an evening forum with the youth encouraging them to live a Godly life
18-25/8 Pam teaching at the Bible College at Yonga Bay
19/8 We both preached at the mid-week service at the Bible College
23/8 I’m to take the whole service (preach and whatever) at the church service at Yonga Bay
25/8-3/9 They haven’t finalised yet but —–
4/9 Meeting at Pambwa where we have to speak
5/9 Official opening of the new Pambwa church building.  I have to give the dedication address?? and preach the sermon and dedication prayer.
14-17/9 Music seminar at Damunu.  Pam’s involved each day; thankfully I’m no muso.
21-25/9 Leader’s conference at Kimuta.  We have a number of teaching sessions on subjects yet to be advised.

In between times we are travelling from place to place and doing other odd jobs.

I keep telling them I’m only an electrician and not a very bright one at that but it is not doing me any good.

God bless,

Phil

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Greetings Everyone,

No e-mails for a week or so as we’ve been in a very rolly anchorage in Kimuta and the Admiral’s stomach only just manages daily living and we spent most of the time ashore enjoying the sandy beaches and the warm sunshine, a pleasant change from rain and mud and more rain.  I did some Sunday School teaching there.  Phil surveyed the church land and printed a clan agreement document and we took part in the dedication ceremony for the new outboard for their dinghy — a major church project and their
future means of evangelism.

Now back in Misima we’ve returned to the rain and mud but also to a church of committed Christians with big plans for evangelism, the major event coming up being the Youth Conference in December.  We did a great PR job for them as we went around the islands and God did an even better one.  We are expecting that upwards of 200 youth will come from five islands; the Rossel ones hoping to hire a trading boat so they can bring all their youth plus the ones from Sudest.  We believe it will have a major
impact on young people.  It’s a lot of hard work for the local youth providing food and accommodation for so many and they are flat out getting ready.

On Sunday Phil and I and Lawrence are going to Hinouta , about an hours walk away to kick start a new fellowship there.  The leaders, Ishmael and his wife Litiani, a goodly older couple with big hearts for their village are giving land so a church can be built and their family can come to know God.  Phil’s preaching so please pray for inspiration for him.

We both are well with no malaria, tropical ulcers or sniffles.

God bless you all,

Pam and Phil

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Greetings Everyone,

Today we bumped coral for the first time. We were leaving early from an anchorage we’d only been into once before and exiting between a sand bar on one side and coral on the other.  We were trying to fine-tune our way point and bumped the coral.  It is not like sand where you slide to a stop.  It was a hard bump as the tip of the coral lump was broken off and we continued on.  Something to be said for steel hulls. (Probably shouldn’t tell you this as our insurance broker also receives the e-mails).  We do feel the value of constant prayer support as protection over us.

We have been travelling constantly for the last week or so, island hopping to work our way against the current and a determined easterly wind down to Rossel Island at the eastern end of the chain.

We stopped at Kimuta on the way and I was able to pray with Beatrice, the young lady whose baby had been dismembered.  I wanted to change that dreadful image in her mind and prayed with her to see Jesus reaching down, holding and restoring her child and taking him to be with Him.  In their culture no-one talks to the person who has had tragic things happen to them — just leaves them to deal with it alone.  She’d really been on my mind.  I feel it went well and only wish there was more follow up for her.

The effect in the community has been a large number of young people coming into the church and they have just started a youth group and are going to liase with Lawrence on Misima.  Please pray for Pastor Palaimo and for John Cameron and his wife as they lead the youth.

Another Christian couple, John and Jullianne on “Eirene” who are doing similar work to us, have a young man, Jordan, with them who is experienced in youth work and has promised to spend time with the youth and their leaders both on Kimuta and Misima and share ideas for games, music, programmes, leadership training, etc.  It’s exciting to see things coming together for these young people.

We have just arrived in Rossel and are looking forward to a church here today and catching up with a lot of friends.

God bless you all,

Pam and Phil

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Greetings Everyone,

It has been some time since the last short update requesting prayer for the Island of Kimuta as things seem to be happening so quickly lately that I can’t keep up. Sorry if this is a bit long.

Phil and I were very impressed with the size of the facilities at the Bethel Centre in Port Moresby. Firstly the sheer size of the complex is impressive. The church has a seating for 1000 set out in rows of different coloured chairs and was more than 3/4 full on both Sunday services. It is the largest free standing wooden beamed structure in the Southern Hemisphere. It has high ceilings and is open-sided to allow airflow and enclosed at one end with extensive meeting rooms and accommodation for delegates to conventions.

The Bible College is a 15 minutes walk away and has numerous buildings of mixed bush materials and permanent housing and can caterer for about 80 students. The grounds are well kept with lots of greenery and big shady trees — a strong contrast to the dry, dusty littered look of the surrounding area. We were housed in a motel type room, a pleasant change from the Starship.

We were impressed with the calibre of the staff, virtually all nationals apart from a gentle New Zealand lady, Auntie Jean, involved in children’s ministry who has been at Bethel for 31 years and Jeremy Steel and his family involved in administration and maintenance.

Phil was impressed to see Pastor Fuwe, the head of the CRC Church in all PNG, up at 5am in his old clothes chopping fire wood with the students. He’s a real leader with servanthood.

The third thing that impressed us was the commitment of the students. It was good to catch up with those we knew — Jeremiah — whose fees had been paid by one of our friends in Australia, Mark who did his commitment at Rossel and Gabriel, ditto at Alotau and Rame, a young lady from Alotau who flew to the Philippines last Saturday to continue missionary work in Muslim areas there. Many of these young men and women have a burning desire to serve overseas — no money or idea where it will come frombut strong faith in God to provide. We would like to help some of them find the team support and funding necessary for overseas missionary service.

At the Children Workers’ Conference there were about 50 delegates most from the area around Port Moresby but also from the five other southern provinces, a good mix of older people with experience to share and new ones eager to learn, including ten men. There were three of us teaching, me, Jean and Allen Steel, a pastor working with aboriginal people in Alice Springs. We were a good team and fitted in well together.

However, the thing that came home to me was that all those who could afford to come to the conference had access to some materials and teaching and really brought home to me the value of our yacht ministry which enables us to take materials and teaching to the isolated areas where they have nothing. That’s where our heart is.

An update on the Kimuta tragedy. It turns out that the mother was bathing her baby, about two years old, when a fellow came up and grabbed the child. The mother said please don’t hurt my baby and the fellow then cut off his head and dismembered him in front of the mother, shoved the pieces in his bag and went bush leaving behind one hand. The mother fainted and when she came around was, naturally, uncontrollable. Last we heard they have not found the remains. The island only has 600 population
and many are related. The child was the nephew of our friend that was minding our boat while we were at Port Moresby and he was keen to get back to his family. The fellow had been to Lae and got involved with Satan worship. He was arrested and put in the jail at Misima but we heard yesterday that he had escaped.

Since the time at Bethel we have completed a Relationship Conference at Alotau and then bashed our way back to Panaeati. That trip took three days of hard motoring and almost $300 of fuel (at PNG prices). The trip the other way only took 28 hours and no motoring. Going to Alotau is not our favorite pastime!!!!

At Panaeati Phil installed another solar panel and lights in the pastor’s house. When we return later this year he will put lights in the church. We hope to add a radio at this island next year.

We showed the leaders the video “How Great is Your God” and it really impacted on them. The head pastor preached from it on Sunday emphasizing the bigness of our God and outlining the immediate plans they have for evangelism of their nearest island and then further afield using the large sailing canoe called “El Shaddai” which they completed last year.

Tomorrow we are heading back to Misima to regroup and then head for Rossel Island.

God bless you all,

Pam and Phil

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500 viewings

G’day Commissioner,

Good to hear from you. I would never of thought over 500 people would look at the web-site. Thanks for doing it for us!!!!

We are still getting over the shock of the incident at Kimuta Island. It turns out that the mother was bathing the baby, about two years old, when the fellow came up and grabbed the child. The mother said please don’t hurt my baby and the fellow then cut off its head and dismembered it in front of the mother, shoved it in his bag and went bush leaving behind one hand. The mother fainted and when she came around was naturally uncontrollable. Last we heard they have not found the remains but the fellow is in jail. Shows what can happen when people get involved in Satan worship. The island only has 600 population and many are related. The wife of the friend who looked after our boat while we were at Port Moresby is a close relation to the child’s mother and he was keen to get back to his family.

It seems like the weather has been a bit cold down your way from what we hear. Even with all the rain we have had it is still shorts and T-shirt weather up here.

Have all the renovations and additions finished yet?

God bless you and Lin and the family.

Phil and Pam

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